Exploring the Aftermath of Silicon Valley Bank and Signature Bank’s Collapse: The Impact of Federal Regulation, Protection of Digital Assets, and the European Data Act

The past week has been fraught with peril in the banking industry worldwide. In the United States, the collapse of Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) and Signature Bank sent shock waves through the world of finance. In the past week, due to their collapses, the FDIC and Congress began investigating the cause and held hearings on the matter. (https://www.armorfenceco.com/) Meanwhile, smaller banks, like those in Mid-Size Bank Coalition of America, asked federal regulators to extend insurance on all deposits in the wake of the twinning’s failure.

Things in the cryptocurrency world aren’t much better, as the fallout from the SVB collapse threatened the value of numerous digital assets. To combat this, U.S. Governor Mark Gordon of Wyoming stepped in, signing a bill to protect the privacy of digital asset owners by preventing the forced disclosure of private keys. Despite the protection, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York has declined the U.S. government’s reasons for halting Binance.US’ acquisition of bankrupt brokerage firm Voyager Digital, citing the interests of former clients who are awaiting the return of their funds.

And to make matters worse, Europe has passed the Data Act, which grants smart contracts equal protection compared to other forms of contract. The legislation is intended to “boost innovation by removing barriers obstructing access to industrial data”, but possibly backfire due to a lack of immutability guarantees that the act brings.

All in all, it’s been a troubling time for the banking and digital asset markets and, though the dust has begun to settle, much uncertainty remains. For many, the biggest questions include what, if any, ramifications the collapse of SVB and Signature Bank will have on the future of banking, and whether government regulations are doing enough to protect digital assets.

Exploring the Aftermath of Silicon Valley Bank and Signature Bank’s Collapse: The Impact of Federal Regulation, Protection of Digital Assets, and the European Data Act

The recent collapse of Silicon Valley Bank (SVB) and Signature Bank sent shock waves through the world of finance, leaving many to wonder what happened and how it will affect our banking infrastructure moving forward. To combat the resulting fallout and provide protection for digital asset owners, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and U.S. government, as well as the European Parliament, all reacted with their own regulations. But will these laws and regulations be enough to protect the industry?

The FDIC was appointed by the California regulator for protection of deposits, and the Bank of England declared SVB UK will “stop making payments or accepting deposits”; additionally, the Mid-Size Bank Coalition of America (MBCA) asked the federal government to extend insurance on all deposits to stabilize the industry. But beyond the FDIC, the U.S. government and Governor Mark Gordon of Wyoming has taken further steps in protecting the rights of digital asset owners. Governor Gordon signed a bill preventing the forced disclosure of private keys to maintain the privacy of individuals – exemptions only being made to allow individuals to disclose the ownership or transfer of crypto during any lawful proceedings.

Europe has also adopted its own changes, passing the Data Act that grants smart contracts equal protection compared with other forms of contract. The legislation removed barriers blocking access to industrial data and was designed to “boost innovation”, but questions remain as to whether the lack of immutability guarantees that the act brings will lead to unforeseen circumstances in the long run.

Though the dust has begun to settle, it’s unclear what repercussions the twinning collapse of SVB and Signature Bank has had, or will have, on the future of banking, or if the government regulations are enough to protect digital assets and the financial industry as a whole. With so much turbulence still swirling, it’s difficult to predict the long-term consequences of this turbulent period. What is clear is that the twinning collapse of two major banks is a warning sign of the importance of a properly regulated banking system that is mindful of the potential volatility of digital assets and transactions. In order to ensure a safe and secure banking environment with adequate protections to digital asset owners, these regulations need to be continuously monitored, re-evaluated and strengthened when necessary.

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Kassidy Florette
Kassidy followed her friends to buy her first Bitcoin in 2015, has been participating in various projects since 2019 as a marketing communication lead. Her knowledge and passion brings her in as a contributor.